Columbia Aeneid Influence

Columbia Aeneid Influence

 

As an epic journey to Hell and back, The Inferno clearly traces its ancestry, in part, to The Aeneid. As an “autobiographical” record of a spiritual struggle, it also has equally obvious roots in Augustine’s Confessions. We come to this book, then, uniquely well-versed in its literary antecedents. Where do you see the influence of The Aeneid in Dante’s poem? Of Confessions? • • Your response should be at least 500 words in length Use MLA format for any quotations or citations that you use to support your answer Please Replies to other students writing here As an epic journey to Hell and back, The Inferno clearly traces its ancestry, in part, to The Aeneid. As an “autobiographical” record of a spiritual struggle, it also has equally obvious roots in Augustine’s Confessions. We come to this book, then, uniquely well-versed in its literary antecedents. Where do you see the influence of The Aeneid in Dante’s poem? Of Confessions? If you have ever wondered about hell Dante’s The Inferno is going to be your go to guide for this influential and biblical journey. We tend to imagine or picture Hell as a plague of fire and death, but what if hell was like heaven? Big golden gates in the clouds where the purest live eternally is what I picture as heaven. Whose to say hell does not have golden gates. Maybe hell is where we all must travel to get to heaven. Dante gives us basically a hitchhiker’s guide to hell and his journey through it. You might be wondering how someone just goes traveling to hell on a little adventure and then come back. Well this is where Aeneas comes into play. When Dante doubts, he has the qualities for his great voyage, he tells Virgil “I am no Aeneas, no Paul” (Inf. II, 32). This is because Aeneas was a great warrior and he is not. Dante fears the hardships he may encounter on his adventure. You have to take into account though that Dante was Italian and during the time he wrote this there was this thing called the Roman Empire and they weren’t too fond of the Greeks and you can definitely tell when reading it. The whole story is basically a funnel into hell with each layer being some sin of some kind such as gluttony, lust, etc. Virgil who is the Author of The Aeneid is Dante’s guide so this is more so an Italian fan fiction guided by his most loved idol. Dante tries to climb his way to heaven but is not worthy enough, so Virgil shows up to make him worthy and this is how The Aeneid is influenced through The Inferno. Dante is writing from a perspective of previous writings by Virgil religious and otherwise non-religious teachings. Every single person Dante comes across on his journey through hell with Virgil for some odd reason seem to be Greek. Coincidence? I think not. Anyone Dante does not like was in some form or ano ther in one of the circles of hell. Once they make it into the depths of hell as far as they go to encounter Lucifer (the Devil) all the souls to include lucifer are buried under ice. Once they climb down far enough, they emerge from the earth and with Dante full of fear, regret, and many other feelings and he starts his journey of redemption. Virgil guides him the whole way. He eventually makes it up the mountain and into heaven. It is quite the story as some parts are comedic like when the demons get stuck in the tar in the eighth circle of hell and blame Dante. That was funny if I do say so myself. Throughout the story however there are numerous references to individuals throughout history who have died and completed some wrong doings to include the Pope, Some greeks Dante didn’t like or wasn’t fond of, the guy that had Jesus crucified, and even the guys that stabbed Ceasar were in hell. If this was reality then we would all go to hell. Works Cited: Dante Alighieri, and John Ciardi. The Inferno

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